It's great to take your work and habits seriously, but what happens when you can't ever just "let go?"

This is incredibly common for entrepreneurs and creators. They control themselves and their environment – allowing them to be productive but at the expense of their ability to turn off work at the end of the day.

You might feel some superiority from being the one in the gym at night while everyone else is out at the bars, or the person up early while friends are at brunch, but at what expense?

When there is a need and discomfort that comes from not being consistent in your habits, missing a routine, eating "bad" food... it turns into compulsion.

Deeper than that, it builds fear and instability within yourself – one where everything has to be just right for you to function.

Letting go is a skill and one that's just important as winding up, controlling yourself, and staying focused.

If we can't "let go" we risk not being able to allow so much of what life gives us.

We miss moments, overlook opportunities, keep serious instead of spontaneous, and worst of all begin to build a sense of distrust with ourselves.

Maybe it's not the next piece of cake that kills you, but the lack of saying yes to it.

For those whom this is uncomfortable - allowing yourself to let go is a practice.

It takes practice to allow... and runs counter to your zone of safety.

For you, allowing instead of controlling sparks a deep-seated fear that you won't be able to return or recover... that things will spiral out of control.

So, how do you let go?

You don't interrupt the impulse.

You allow things to play out, rather than acting to manipulate them in your favor.

You practice watching an idea, opportunity, spontaneity arrives and see it through rather than putting a lid on it, or hiding, or creating misdirection.

Travel is a great practice for letting go. So is speaking with strangers. It feels like that moment when you're at the beach... and you sleepily let your guard down.

Letting go is a choice and an opportunity.

The more you practice, the less afraid you'll be.